Moving with Jazz Instruments

Moving with Musical Instruments

Wind instruments–including the trumpet, saxophone, horn, flute, tuba, trombone, oboe, clarinet and saxophone–require special care when moving day rolls around. Shakes, bumpy roads or extreme temperatures can leave lasting damages on your jazz instruments, so leaving them to roll around in the back of a moving truck or trailer without being safely secured is detrimental to their longevity. Jazz musicians, listen up! Follow these tips when moving with musical instruments to make sure everything arrives safely and still plays beautifully.

Moving with Musical InstrumentsWrap the instruments

Keeping the jazz instruments in their cases is an important first step, but they still risk damage in the back of a truck or enclosed trailer. Before placing the smaller instruments in boxes, pack them with packing peanuts and shield each item with bubble wrap. That way, you’ll alleviate any potential breaks or scratches if the wind instruments shift during the drive to your new place. For an additional layer of protection, line the inside of the boxes with cloth. Be sure to cover up any openings on your instruments using tape and towels to prevent packing peanut pieces from becoming lodged inside.

Many jazz bands include drums in their performances, and although they are not entirely metal, the same rules apply. For drums, your move will be safest if you first take apart the drum parts and nest each piece within the others. Wrap the legs and other separate pieces with bubble wrap, and make sure the box you choose has a few extra inches of room to stuff with packing peanuts or paper.

Moving with Musical InstrumentsStore them for climate-controlled acclimation

Because jazz instruments are often temperature-sensitive, and moving day introduces plenty of new climates, it’s crucial to maintain a steady, dry room temperature for your jazz instruments. Keeping them in climate-controlled storage for a few days (or until you need them again) is the best way to preserve your instruments after moving day. However, certain wind instrument parts–such as the oboe or clarinet reed–require humidity and some moisture to preserve well. You can purchase a portable humidifier for your reed to prevent cracks from forming.

Moving with Musical InstrumentsWait to play them

Musical instruments need time to get used to new environments, too. Wait a day or two to play them again so they can adjust to the new climate, since moving day involves a number of changes. The best way to protect your jazz instruments is to keep them at room temperature

Whether you’re in a symphony, jazz band or you just enjoy playing a wind instrument in your leisure time, meticulously preserving your musical instruments on moving day will make life in your new home an enjoyable experience–and a lovely sounding one at that!

Do you play any jazz instruments? Leave any tips on how you keep them safe during moving day in the comments section below!